Decode / decrypt a SHA1 hash

This tool searches multiple rainbow tables for matches to a large number of SHA1 hashes. To generate a MD5 or SHA1 hash click here. SHA1 is a hashing alorithm and therefore is technically not encryption, but hashes can be resolved using rainbow tables. The database contains millions of SHA1 hashes and matching sources. To lookup MD5 hash codes click here. To lookup SHA256 hash codes click here

Enter 40 character SHA1 hash to decode or decrypt

Enter security code:
Enter 40 digit hash:

Recent SHA1 lookups

Wp>q+pn!Sl
SHA1:22ce077dacaddbd61bf99d386362c2e802cbd232
!R
SHA1:d05e90fe3935b2360faecf270c458e6a9155e461
CFU
SHA1:2bd751b42747981b17362211c381dbf438c08603
A>7k
SHA1:4cdd030e7d773453acdfa395dd0c113ab543f8ab
CaZ4QxqLWI
SHA1:a00aa7a927328a4fa264757619515956db037a48
YRGMFZH.0A
SHA1:d58059498ae6fac5726ba1dcdb215da5322dc89a
CJ+,
SHA1:f6e014489b7e9c59cac1f03738bfd4e59759c132
_e*
SHA1:6e0af0a33d3f1eb0f9d0078b24fdd53a7ef1bc95
AXi
SHA1:fc143d5cd2d453d9c55655aa0a84ad5f0cdb8a34
av1
SHA1:d69bff1f7e4834820d5e12e322e92afd96337f52

About SHA1 hashes

"SHA-1 forms part of several widely used security applications and protocols, including TLS and SSL, PGP, SSH, S/MIME, and IPsec. Those applications can also use MD5; both MD5 and SHA-1 are descended from MD4. Revision control systems such as Git, Mercurial, and Monotone use SHA-1 not for security but to identify revisions and to ensure that the data has not changed due to accidental corruption"